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Chappaquiddick (2017)


Chappaquiddick (2017)

Prior to seeing this movie, I had no knowledge of Ted Kennedy’s infamous scandal.  This is not something that is talked about in school.  I remember having class discussions about the assassination of JFK.  However, I never heard a word about how JFK’s brother, Ted tarnished the family name.  It makes you wonder about all of the things that get left out of the history books.

Chappaquiddick is based on the true story of when in 1969 Senator Ted Kennedy fled the scene of a car accident in which his woman passenger was left to drown in his submerged vehicle on Chappaquiddick Island.

The movie was directed by John Curran and the noteworthy cast includes Jason Clarke, Ed Helms, Jim Gaffigan, Kate Mara, Bruce Dern, and Clancy Brown.

The movie let the story speak for itself.  It was slow and methodical and seems factual.  This is certainly not a feel-good film, nor is it a movie that you are going to want to rush out and see a second time.

Ted really disgraced the Kennedy name.  I always hear about the bad luck that surrounded the Kennedys, but there was also a lot of scandal that surrounded them.  I believe that you make your own luck in life.  Obviously, a lot of the things that happened to the Kennedys were awful, but it does make me wonder how much of the scandalous stuff they brought on themselves.  Just think about how many conspiracy theories revolve around the Kennedys.

The almost full theater that I was in was eerily quiet after the film ended.  I think that was because the story was a sick display of what people with a position of power, especially in government, are capable of.

This was a disturbingly vile true story of how America was duped and Ted Kennedy successfully swept manslaughter under the rug.  He seemed to show no remorse for being responsible for a woman’s death.  All he cared about was protecting his political career.

It is a travesty that Ted was able to go on to be one of the longest running senators in history.  It goes to show just how corrupt the government can be.

I have not been a big fan of Jason Clarke.  He just has not been very likable in anything that I have seen him in.  He played his part of Ted Kennedy well in this movie, however.  To the point where I do not like him because of how bad his character is.  That is how you know an actor is decent; when he is a believable bad guy.

The thought of two comedians (Gaffigan and Helms) in serious roles in this film made me nervous, but they were both likable for the parts that they played.

The filmmaking of Chappaquiddick was not overdone.  They told the story and did not sugarcoat it.  With how far left Hollywood leans, I am a little surprised that this film even got made, and furthermore, made wide release.  The movie felt impartial politically, which I felt was tasteful.  Too often movies will attack one political party with slanted views and opinions to further their agenda.  Chappaquiddick seemed to just stick to the facts and try to tell both sides of the story without choosing a side.

I rate this movie a 7.5 on a scale of 1-10.

 

If you liked this film then you might also enjoy:

 

JFK (1991)

Bobby (2006)

Jackie (2016)

Lincoln (2012)

All the President’s Men (1976)

The Post (2017)

Wag the Dog (1997)

The Manchurian Candidate (1962)

The Manchurian Candidate (2004)

The Ides of March (2011)

Munich (2005)

Beirut (2018)

The American President (1995)

State of Play (2009)

Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939)

Citizen Kane (1941)

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The Philadelphia Story (1940)


The Philadelphia Story (1940)

I got to enjoy a special showing of this film in the theater recently.  I love to go back and watch the classics.  Especially, the way that they were meant to be seen, on the big screen.  Usually you cannot go wrong with Cary Grant, James Stewart, or Katharine Hepburn.  The Philadelphia Story gathers the trio together in the same film.  Talk about star power.  Now, the three are silver screen legends.  At the time this movie was released, all of these actors were in their prime.  That is easily why 78 years later, the film is still being played in the theater.  Can you imagine very many movies that were made in our time that will still be played in theaters 78 years from now?  That is, of course, if theaters still exist in 78 years.

The movie is about a wealthy woman who is about to get married for the second time.  However, her ex-husband and a reporter show up shortly before the wedding and stir things up.

The film is based on the play by Philip Barry.  It is directed by George Cukor and the rest of the noteworthy cast includes Ruth Hussey, John Howard, Roland Young, Mary Nash, John Halliday, Virginia Weidler, and Henry Daniell.

This movie feels almost more like a play, because it is all about the dialogue and timing of acting.  It is the conversations and connections between the characters.  The setting does not change much and the audience is more focused on the people instead of the place anyway.  This is all understandable of course, because it is based on a play.

The film is filled with grace, wit, humor, life, flawlessness, class, elegance, and charm.  Those characteristics all together in one movie in today’s world hardly exist.

Hepburn, Stewart, and Grant play off of each other perfectly.  They seem to all equally contribute, which is especially rare in today’s movies for three such big names to carry the film equally.  The dialogue is very amusing throughout.  In a way, I feel like the film captured a little piece of their heart and soul for your enjoyment.  A timeless classic.  Like a fine wine, The Philadelphia Story is aged to perfection.

 

I rate this movie a 10 on a scale of 1-10.

To achieve this 10 rating, you have to understand that the film truly has stood the test of time.  For what it is, it is a 10.  To truly appreciate this however, you have to have an appreciation for old movies.  You have to step outside the box that is the film industry of the present.  Take out the action.  Take out the special effects.  It is heart and soul during the golden age of Hollywood forever captured and preserved for your viewing pleasure.  A taste of the past held onto for so many years.  We held on to it so tight because it is historic and beautiful.

 

If you liked this film, than you might also enjoy:

My Favorite Wife (1940)

Bringing Up Baby (1938)

Holiday (1938)

It’s A Wonderful Life (1939)

His Girl Friday (1940)

The Shop Around the Corner (1940)

Mr. Lucky (1943)

The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer (1947)

Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House (1948)

I Was a Male War Bride (1949)

Monkey Business (1952)

Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939)

Houseboat (1958)

Adam’s Rib (1949)