Redbox Best Comedy Movies List March 2018

Redbox Best Comedy Movies March 2018

redbox box

There are not very many titles on this list and here is why.  First off, really funny movies are few and far between, these days.  Hollywood has somehow gotten the idea that they have to make movies with a little bit of everything in it.  They spit out movies with a little bit of story, a little bit of action, some drama, and a sprinkle of comedy, and then they call it a comedy.  They are diluted comedies.  What is the problem with that?  Well, it is usually not very funny or entertaining.  The most recent example of this is Gringo (2018).

I think Redbox has picked up on this, because not only do they have plenty of terrible comedy movies to choose from, they continue to bring back past comedies that were very successful when they were out originally.  Notice how half of these movies came out before 2017?  Notice also how half of these movies have Will Ferrell in them?  Will Ferrell literally accounts for half of the best comedies inside of the box.

Below is my list of the best comedy movies that I have seen that are currently at Redbox.


The Best Comedy Movies Currently at the Redbox March 2018:


Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy (2004)

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues (2013)

Elf (2003)

21 Jump Street (2012)

22 Jump Street (2014)

Daddy’s Home (2015)

Daddy’s Home 2 (2017)

The House (2017)

CHIPS (2017)

Baywatch (2017)

Going in Style (2017)

Wilson (2017)


The Best Movies of 2010

The Best Movies of 2010


Below is my list of the best movies that I have seen that were released in 2010 (even if some were made in 2009).  I have included trailers for each movie.  I would love to eventually write a review of each of these films and talk about why I enjoyed them so much.  But for now, just know that I highly recommend all of these movies.  I will continue to add to this list if I see any more movies from 2010 that are worthy of this list.


The Fighter (2010)

Edge of Darkness (2010)

Shutter Island (2010)

Inception (2010)

RED (2010)

127 Hours (2010)

Due Date (2010)

The Next Three Days (2010)

Love & Other Drugs (2010)

The King’s Speech (2010)

Black Swan (2010)

True Grit (2010)  

Harry Brown (2009)

The Expendables (2010)

Kick-Ass (2010)


Movies that were good, but did not quite make the list are:

The Book of Eli (2010)

Defendor (2009)

Repo Men (2010)

A Nightmare on Elm Street (2010)

Toy Story 3 (2010)

Knight and Day (2010)

Salt (2010)

The Switch (2010)

Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps (2010)

The Social Network (2010)

Stone (2010)

Little Fockers (2010)

The Tourist (2010)

Gringo (2018)

Gringo (2018)

I did not expect much from a movie titled Gringo.  From the trailer it appeared like it would be a fun, goofy, action, dark dramedy.  Sometimes it is OK to watch dumb humor and that is what I expected with Gringo.  How many other movies where the title is a racial slur would you expect to be any good?

With a cast that includes the likes of Charlize Theron, Joel Edgerton, Sharlto Copley, and Amanda Seyfried, it would be hard to go wrong, right?

The movie is about how an average business trip to Mexico for Harold Soyinka, quickly takes a turn for the worse and he finds himself in a tangled mess between a drug cartel, the police, and his backstabbing boss.

The movie was directed by Nash Edgerton and the rest of the noteworthy cast includes David Oyelowo, Thandie Newton, Alan Ruck, Kenneth Choi, Melonie Diaz, Harry Treadaway, and Yul Vasquez.

This is one of those movies that overcompensates in the trailer to make the movie look a lot more entertaining than it actually is.

I has its comedic moments, but not very many of them.  If has some action, but not very much of it.  You get to like the characters, but on a little bit.  I was actually shocked at how not funny this movie was.

How do you assign the comedy genre to a movie that is not very funny?  This has become more and more common for Hollywood, these days.  There are too many subgenres.  This is an example of a movie that is trying to be too many of those subgenres at once.  It wants to be a comedy (dark, stupid, witty, goofy), drama, and action.  You cannot always have your cake and eat it too.  You cannot lump all of those genres in to a film and always expect to pull it off.

This movie bleeds with underused talent.  It is a comedy for actors that are not known for comedy and it shows because they have a lot of trouble actually pulling off humor of any kind.

Sharlto Copley stole the show.  He managed to bring the most amount of comedy and entertainment to the film, even though it still fell short.

The movie was just not very fun.  I found myself a little bored about two thirds of the way through.

Overall, Gringo is a poorly written “dramedy” with a little bit of action.  Even the cast cannot save this film.  It is worth a rental if you are curious about the movie, but do not waste your money in the theater unless you have a MoviePass.

I rate this movie a 4 on a scale of 1-10.


If you liked this film then you might also enjoy:


Masterminds (2016)

We’re the Millers (2013)

Keeping up with the Joneses (2016)

The Hangover (2009)

The Hangover II (2011)

The Hangover III (2013)

Horrible Bosses (2011)

Horrible Bosses 2 (2014)

Due Date (2010)

Hall Pass (2011)

Office Christmas Party (2016)

Bad Words (2013)

Identity Thief (2013)

The Best Movies of 2011

The Best Movies of 2011


Below is my list of the best movies that I have seen that were released in 2011 (even if some were made in 2010).  I have included trailers for each movie.  I would love to eventually write a review of each of these films and talk about why I enjoyed them so much.  But for now, just know that I highly recommend all of these movies.  I will continue to add to this list if I see any more movies from 2011 that are worthy of this list.


The Town (2011)

Limitless (2011)

Hugo (2011)

The Lincoln Lawyer (2011)

Moneyball (2011)

Source Code (2011)

The Beaver (2011)

50/50 (2011)

In Time (2011)

Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol (2011)

30 Minutes or Less (2011)

Change-Up (2011)

Take Me Home Tonight (2011)


Movies that were good, but did not quite make the list are:

The Adjustment Bureau (2011)

Unknown (2011)

The Ides of March (2011)

The Window (1949)

The Window (1949)

(I could not find a trailer for this film to post with my review, so here is a very short clip instead).

I saw this movie for the first time on a 16mm print when I was about 8 years old.  It was enough to spook me back then.  I love watching old movies like The Window and being transported back in time to a simpler time.  You can see what the big city was like back then and how it has vigorously transformed, over the years.

Recently, I got to attend a special showing of this film at The Heights Theater in Columbia Heights, MN as part of an RKO Film Noir Festival.  People often ask me, what “Film Noir” is.

According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary the definition of “Film Noir” is: “a type of crime film featuring cynical malevolent characters in a sleazy setting and an ominous atmosphere that is conveyed by shadowy photography and foreboding background music; also: a film of this type.”

I do not think that “Film Noir” could be defined any better.

The Window is about a 9-year-old boy who is notorious for crying wolf.  One night he looks through his neighbor’s window and witnesses a murder.  Of course, nobody believes him except for the killers and they want to silence him.

The movie was directed by Ted Tetzlaff and the noteworthy cast includes Bobby Driscoll, Barbara Hale, Arthur Kennedy, Paul Stewart, and Ruth Roman.

The premise of this movie has been duplicated many times (i.e. Rear Window (1954), Disturbia (2007)) because the subject matter itself, is pretty scary.  Could you imagine living next to a killer?

The film holds up today because of the tension that it is able to build up throughout the story.  The length of the movie was quite fitting in order to keep it more intense throughout without it having much of a chance to slow down.

Bobby Driscoll does an exceptional job for his age.  He holds his own throughout the whole movie.  He actually won a special Academy Award for his performance in The Window as the “outstanding juvenile actor” of 1949.

The villains of The Window are quite ruthless for the time that the movie was made.  In particular, Paul Stewart delivers a memorable performance.  Stewart made quite a career as a character actor.  He became typecast as the “bad guy” or gangster, mostly because he was awesome playing those parts.  Besides The Window, I really liked him in Mr. Lucky (1943).

You just cannot get the same shadow effects now as you could in black and white, back in the day.  The malevolent characters, sleazy setting, and foreboding background music all excellently portray an ominous atmosphere that is the classic “Film Noir”, The Window.

If you enjoy a good thriller, The Window still holds up today.  You could even watch it with your kids and help teach them never to “cry wolf.”

I rate this movie a 9 on a scale of 1-10.


If you liked this film then you might also enjoy:


Rear Window (1954)

Disturbia (2007)

Compulsion (1949)

Shadow of a Doubt (1943)

Murder, My Sweet (1944)

Non-Stop (2014)

Flightplan (2005)

Murder on the Orient Express (2017)

The Girl on the Train (2016)

Red Sparrow (2018)

Red Sparrow (2018)

This movie appeared like it would be a cross between Atomic Blonde (2017) and Black Swan (2010).  I always find it interesting how after such a unique film like Atomic Blonde is released, shortly after we get a copycat movie (I will talk more about this concept in a post in the near future).

I have gotten fed up with actors and actresses feeling the need to be politicians.  As if their political opinions matter.  Please just do what you do best and stick to filmmaking.  It gets a little old when they stir up the negativity.

All politics aside, Jennifer Lawrence is a talented actress.  I feel that she proved her ability in her role in Silver Linings Playbook (2012).  She has a tendency to make insanely outrageous statements that are about as inappropriate as some of the things that come out of President Donald Trump’s mouth.  This has started to taint my view of Lawrence as an actress.  If she was a little more careful with her words publicly, I would respect her more.

Prior to seeing this movie, I went to the theater with an open mind.  Instead of having a biased and negative opinion before even seeing the film, I thought I would let Jennifer Lawrence’s acting do the talking and drown out the crazy things that she says publicly.

Red Sparrow is about a damaged Russian ballerina who finds herself training to be a “Sparrow”, a Special Agent of sorts for the Russian government.  She is tasked with getting information from the American C.I.A. and becomes entangled between both governments working against each other.

The movie was directed by Francis Lawrence and the noteworthy cast includes Jennifer Lawrence, Joel Edgerton, Matthias Shoenaerts, Jeremy Irons, Charlotte Rampling, Mary-Louise Parker, Ciaran Hinds, Joely Richardson, Douglas Hodge, Bill Camp, Sakina Jaffrey, and Thekla Reuten.

The film did in fact, feel like a cross between Atomic Blonde and Black Swan.  However, there was much less action than Atomic Blonde and far more drama.  It has the surprising sexual darkness of Black Swan, only much more magnified.  The graphic violence in the movie is a lot more twisted and vicious than Atomic Blonde.

I did not think that Jennifer Lawrence was going to be able to pull off a Russian accent.  I was worried that this would really take away from the movie.  For the most part, the accent was OK though.  Towards the end of the film, it started going in and out, but overall was believable.  Her performance was quite gritty.  There were some surprisingly twisted nude scenes.  It definitely has the shock value.

Edgerton’s character was likable, but he was a little underused.  His character was not quite developed enough.  That was acceptable, because it really is Jennifer Lawrence’s movie.  However, I feel like this did take away from the film.  The chemistry between the male lead and female lead was just not there.

I did feel like Red Sparrow was trying really hard to be like Atomic Blonde.  All the way down to platinum blonde hair and Stoli vodka.  Charlize Theron was a much bigger badass in Atomic Blonde than Jennifer Lawrence was Red Sparrow.  Atomic Blonde was a lot more fun and exciting.  The dark subject matter in Red Sparrow was not broken up with any humor or much fun.  I feel that took away from the overall quality of movie because it makes the 2 hours and 19 minutes runtime feel like that amount of time.  They did not cut the tension and therefore it felt like it was trying too hard to be too dark.

This is a shadowy spy thriller that pulls no punches.  It is intentionally and methodically puzzling.  The film is a little rough around the edges, but overall is well-made and well-acted.

I rate this movie a 7 on a scale of 1-10.


If you liked this film then you might also enjoy:


Atomic Blonde (2017)

Salt (2010)

Black Swan (2010)

Casino Royale (2006)

Skyfall (2012)

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011)

Mission: Impossible (1996)

Mission: Impossible III (2006)

Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol (2011)

Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation (2015)

All the Money in the World (2017)

All the Money in the World (2017)

When I think of All the Money in the World, it is hard not to think about everything that happened with Kevin Spacey and the bad publicity that surrounded this film because of him.  It is my understanding that the movie was just about completed when the news came out about his sexual allegations.

(This is my review of All the Money in the World, but I feel that it is important to talk first about the cloud of negativity that hovered over this movie before its release.  There is a certain amount of hypocrisy that has been a part of the Hollywood machine for many years.  It still is today).

I think that the producers of the movie agreed that All the Money in the World was guaranteed to bomb at the box office because of Spacey.  So how did they resolve this problem?  The same way that Netflix resolved their Spacey problem with the infamous House of Cards firing, they cut him out of the film completely.  They brought Christopher Plummer in to replace him.  Then they had to reshoot all of Spacey’s scenes with Plummer instead.  How that will pan out with the Netflix Original Series House of Cards is yet to be seen, but that is a topic for a different day.

Spacey was originally billed second.  His character was a big deal to the film.  They had to bring in the other actors and redo a good chunk of the whole movie so that they could replace him.  This all had to be done with only weeks remaining until the film was due to be released!

I read that it took about 9 days to completely reshoot the necessary scenes to cut Kevin Spacey completely out of All the Money in the World.  That is insane if you think about it.  Ridley Scott did what they thought would be impossible to try to salvage the film.

Now, if that was not enough, more controversy instantly surfaced about the reshoots.  Apparently, Walhberg negotiated that he would get paid somewhere in the millions of dollars if he had to film any extra scenes.  He has a good agent and he is one of the highest paid actors out there, so this comes as no surprise right?  Wrong.  To stir things up more, now all of a sudden, people were complaining because he got paid far more than Michelle Williams or any of the other actors for his reshoots.  They were paid thousands and he was paid millions.  The complaint was that there should be closer to equal pay for all involved.

I am all for women’s rights.  I am glad that they were able to erase Spacey from this film because of his sexual misconduct.  They should have cracked down on all of that years ago.  We all know, and they all know that people in power in Hollywood have been taking advantage of that power for far too long and nothing has really been done about it until recently.

However, I believe in the free market.  People should be able to negotiate their worth.  They get paid for what they contribute.  The superstars get paid more because they bring more to the table.  That is how it always has been and how it always should be.  If you want to look at equal pay between men and women in Hollywood, I think you need to look deeper into the fact that Hollywood treats women like objects.  Hollywood writers do not write many quality roles for women.  Instead women are seen as window dressing and men are made out to be the heroes.  That is not a problem with the actors or actresses.  That is a problem with the filmmakers, and ultimately the big production companies that have gotten big for a reason, because they know how to make money.

What does Mark Wahlberg do when he hears that many people believe that he got overpaid and he is looked at as being part of the problem?  Marky Mark turns around and donates all of the extra millions of dollars that he made for reshoots to “Time’s Up” in Michelle Williams name.

All of the Money in the World is based on true events.  It is about a teenage boy who is kidnapped and held for ransom because his grandfather is the richest man in the world.  The grandfather will not pay the ransom, and the boy’s mother is forced to do whatever is in her power to try to get her son back.

The movie was directed by Ridley Scott and the noteworthy cast includes Michelle Williams, Christopher Plummer, Mark Wahlberg, Timothy Hutton, Charlie Plummer, Romain Duris, Charlie Shotwell, Andrew Buchan, and Marco Leonardi.

Ridley Scott generally knows how to get a film done right.  He has got the process down.  Sometimes the expectation is higher than the outcome, however.  This is the case with this movie.  It is well made to a point.  It jumps around a lot.  Usually that is OK to tell a story, but it makes this film feel a little choppy.  It also seems to take away from how we feel about the characters in the story.  We are not given much of a chance to really like and care about the people in the movie.  If we do not care much about the characters, then we do not care much about what happens to them.

I think that this disconnect exists in the movie because it is in fact, based on true events.  They follow the story line of what happened in real life, but they do not give you much reason to like the characters.  This strongly takes away from how good the movie could be.  It is good up to a point, without the possibility of being better.

Christopher Plummer got nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for this movie.  He was part of the film for 9 days of reshoots.  With all of the chaos that surrounded All the Money in the World, it seems like Hollywood was just throwing the movie a bone when they nominated Plummer for an Oscar.  He is a solid actor and he was good in this film, but not Oscar good.  Not even close.  I think that this is a case of Hollywood trying to recoup their investment and show praise for Ridley Scott’s ability to get the job done that needed to get done.  If there is an Oscar nomination of any kind for a movie, it pretty much guarantees that people will see it.  It is sort of like the media.  They tell you what they want you to hear.  In this case, they tell you what they want you to watch.

I cannot help but wonder, what the other version of the film with Spacey was like.  With my tainted view of him as an actor at this point, I would have hated the movie.  It was definitely the right thing to do replacing him.  I used to be big fan of Spacey, but it is amazing how quickly your view of someone changes once their true colors bleed through.

Overall, the movie was good, but not that good.  It is an interesting true story that was certainly worth telling.  It felt rushed, because it actually was rushed.  I feel that with more thought placed on character development, the movie could have been a lot better.

I rate this movie a 6.5 on a scale of 1-10.


If you liked this film then you might also enjoy:


Captain Phillips (2013)

John Q. (2002)

Proof of Life (2000)

Hostage (2005)

Inside Man (2006)

The Negotiator (1998)

Ransom (1996)

Broken City (2013)

Lone Survivor (2013)

The Best Movies of 2012

The Best Movies of 2012


Below is my list of the best movies that I have seen that were released in 2012 (even if some were made in 2011).  I have included trailers for each movie.  Click on the highlighted titles for my full reviews of each of those films.  The movies that are not highlighted, I have not reviewed yet, but I still highly recommend them.  I will continue to add to this list if I see any more movies from 2012 that are worthy of this list.


The Impossible (2012)

Silver Linings Playbook (2012)

End of Watch (2012)

The Raid: Redemption (2011)

Django Unchained (2012)

Jack Reacher (2012)

Contraband (2012)

The Grey (2011)

21 Jump Street (2012)

The Hunger Games (2012)

Dark Shadows (2012)

Ted (2012)

The Dark Knight Rises (2012)

Lawless (2012)

Looper (2012)

Sinister (2012)

Frankenweenie (2012)

Argo (2012)

Lincoln (2012)

Skyfall (2012)

Hitchcock (2012)


Movies that were good, but did not quite make the list are:

The Bourne Legacy (2012)

Total Recall (2012)

The Expendables 2 (2012)

Death Wish (2018)

Death Wish (2018)

Why do we like vigilante justice?  I think that it is because someone does exactly what we are thinking should be done or we would like to do, ourselves.  Also, vigilante justice in the movies is often portrayed as sticking up for ones that cannot stick up for themselves.  If you are like me, then you enjoy rooting for the underdog.

Death Wish is about a doctor who decides to take matters into his own hands after an attack on his family.  He decides to find the men responsible and serve up his own form of vigilante justice.

The movie was directed by Eli Roth and the noteworthy cast includes Bruce Willlis, Vincent D’Onofrio, Elisabeth Shue, Dean Norris, Camila Morrone, Beau Knapp, Kimberly Elise, Len Cariou, Jack Kesy, and Ronnie Gene Blevins.

I am not usually one to be into remakes.  It seems like Hollywood remakes or reboots just about everything these days.  Often, I say leave well enough alone, but sometimes the right remake idea comes along and the right actor is cast in the lead role.

In this case, Willis was very fitting for the role in Death Wish.  It was his best performance since Looper (2012).  He has been making a lot of B-rated straight to DVD movies lately, so it is nice to see him return to his former glory.  I am glad to see that he has not gone the way of Nicolas Cage (spitting out one piece of trash after the next).  Death Wish is a one-man-show and Bruce was clearly up for the task.

This movie is a scary concept because of how realistic it is.  What I mean by that is that it shows just how worthless the police department and justice system can be sometimes.  Too often, it is the people that deserve to see justice be done, that are the ones stuck without any justice at all.  It also goes to show just how vulnerable we all are.

The likable Dean Norris has quickly been typecast as the police or detective type thanks to the success of the television series Breaking Bad.  His part in this movie is good, but it does quickly make you think of Breaking Bad.

There are a few noticeable gruesome scenes in this movie that had Roth’s signature all over it.  So far, I believe that this film is Roth’s best work as a director.  He did a terrific job setting the tone of Death Wish and sticking with it throughout.

It has been a very long time since I have seen the original Death Wish (1974), but watching this version has made me want to go back and watch the original sometime soon.  The new film is a quality remake done with today’s technology.  The original movie is now 44 years old and it shows its age.

This movie is a murky suspense/thriller with good old fashioned popcorn-popping action.  Willis as the protagonist doing bad for good reasons will keep you on the edge of your seat hoping that justice gets done.

I rate this movie an 8 on a scale of 1-10.


If you liked this film then you might also enjoy:

Death Wish (1974)

Death Sentence (2007)

The Brave One (2007)

The Boondock Saints (1999)

Man on Fire (2004)

The Equalizer (2014)

The Punisher (2004)

Sin City (2005)

Harry Brown (2009)

RED (2010)

RED 2 (2013)

John Wick (2014)

John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017)

Prisoners (2013)

Defendor (2009)

Heights Theater Columbia Heights, MN

Heights Theater Columbia Heights, MN

The other night I ventured out to see an old classic inside of an older classic.  The beautifully maintained one-screen Heights Theater in Columbia Heights, MN was playing the film, The Window (1949) as part of a recent RKO “Film Noir” film festival that is still going on this month.

The Heights Theater is a nostalgic escape.  It is 92 years old!  It was built in 1926.  Originally, it was used for local stage plays and vaudeville acts, besides a simple movie house.

I was last at this theater a handful of years ago for a Thanksgiving showing of Bringing Up Baby (1938).  Before that, I attended part of a weekend movie marathon there when I was a teenager.

That movie marathon became part of “The Guinness Book of World Records.”  People had the unique opportunity to stay overnight all weekend in the theater (they brought blankets, pillows, toothbrush, etc.).  If they stayed the whole weekend and attended every movie that played each day, then they got their names into “The Guinness Book of World Records” (supposedly, but I never fully looked into that).

If my memory serves me correctly, I went to that movie marathon back then during two of the three days of that weekend.  I was there specifically to see Laurel & Hardy, and I think even The Three Stooges on the big screen.  I also stayed for a couple of feature films, but I cannot remember the titles.

Each time that I have been to the Heights Theater, it looks better than the time before.  The owner of the theater is Tom Letness.  He also owns the Dairy Queen next door.  Both businesses were featured during said movie marathon.  Letness has ensured painstaking restorations which have brought this little Historic Theater back to its former glory.

This little piece of history will transport you back to a simpler time.  There is a certain elegance and sentiment that wafts throughout the lobby.  It is a subtle hint of what to expect when you are actually in the theater, itself.

The theater is an antique and it has been maintained in the same way that you would treat an antique, with care and precision.  There are so many details that bring you back to the atmosphere of old, like the vintage twinkling chandeliers on the ceilings overhead, the flickering marquee above the sidewalk outside, the organ player playing with care before the showing of each film, the gorgeous art posters adorning the walls, the old-fashioned red curtains opening and closing across the small screen before and after the show, and the real butter on the reasonably priced popcorn.  These are among many other things that I have left out for you to see for yourself.

The preservation of this Historic Theater is impressive.  It’s a movie lover’s paradise.  It is definitely worth the visit, if you’ve never been before.

There is an upcoming Alfred Hitchcock Film Festival that I will likely attend.  The classics often make a very fitting return to this classic theater.